October 14, 2015

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8 Things Humans Do That Annoy Dogs

Are you guilty of  doing things that annoy your dog? We are sure you don't mean too, but you might want to be aware of these 8 things and try avoiding them. 

1. Over or Under Exercise

A walk or two and a game of fetch is all the exercise that’s usually needed for most dogs. But sometimes our lives become too busy, resulting in us skipping these sessions. Without them, your dog can become bored, destructive, despondent, and overweight. The simple solution: commit to a reasonable amount of exercise for your dog each day. 

The opposite problem can also occur. Fit persons who go for daily runs of several miles often take their dogs with them for company. But extended runs can for some dogs be annoying or even harmful, depending on the age, breed-type, and temperament of the dog, For instance, an English Bulldog should not be running five miles a day, ever. Nor should heavy breeds such as the Mastiff or toy breeds like the Chihuahua. Dogs older than eight should be okayed by a veterinarian before running more than a mile or two.

If you want to run with your dog, be sure she is of a breed-type able to do so. Sight hounds, most herding and sporting dogs (excluding short-statured spaniels and heavy retrievers), and most breed types with long legs and a lithe, muscular frame often make happy running partners. But even for these dogs, runs over five miles can be harmful in the long term. Worn pads and structural issues can lead to medical intervention and shortened lives. Finding a nice balance of exercise for your dog is the key: remember, it’s for her, not you. In general, if your dog is lagging behind, you’ve taken her too far.

 

2. Incomprehensible Requests

Enough with the monologue. Dogs definitely understand words associated with certain actions, behaviours, and things, but do not get grammar, syntax, or abstract meaning. Nevertheless, we often talk to our dogs at length, thinking that they get what we are asking them to do. This is, of course, totally fine—unless you’re trying to communicate what you’d like them to do.

Apart from enjoying the tone of our voices, our dogs don’t often get what we are driving at. They are much better at reading body language or keying in on specific words. If you need to get something across, don’t jabber away for five minutes or chastise him about something he can’t possibly understand. Be precise with words and tone and always use body posture (think hand signals, such as a hand in the air to request a lie down, or crouching to request “come”, or running away to get your dog to accompany you) whenever possible. Doing so will help you communicate exactly what you want without confounding your pooch and leaving him at a loss as to what you’d like of him. Our dogs aim to please; our job is to give them the tools to do so.

 

3. Forced Socialization

If your dog is happy to be introduced to new people and pets, then by all means, let her enjoy interacting. But if she is reserved and anxious, forcing her to interact can be annoying or even dangerous. Allow your dog to decide when she wants to come over to investigate a new person. When that happens, have the friend drop a treat on the floor and say “good girl.” When introducing your not-super-social dog to a new canine friend, instead of throwing them together, opt for going for a group walk before a dog-to-dog greeting. Form a single-file line with three or four dog/human teams and simply walk around the block. This creates a team feeling among the dogs and slowly desensitizes them to group encounters. After a few blocks, if you think your dog is comfortable enough to greet, go for it. Just never force her to interact: instead, let her demeanor guide your actions.

 

4. Dirty Water

In addition to collecting dust, food bits, hair, and other undesirable flotsam and jetsam, your dog’s water can become contaminated with bacteria or other contagions, especially if other dogs drink from it. Outdoor bowls can be especially vulnerable to contamination or to a forgetful person allowing them to go dry. Fetid water or a dry bowl is a sure way to annoy a thirsty dog.

Every day, clean then refill your dog’s water bowls with fresh water. If a new dog comes to visit, provide it with a separate bowl, to prevent infections from passing to your pet. According to a Kansas State University veterinary study, communal water bowls can become infected with infectious agents, including giardia, parvovirus, leptospirosis, and other dangerous contaminants, so steer clear of public water bowls!

 

5. Manhandling

Children are fast, unpredictable, and impulsive, and can often worry or annoy a dog, especially one unused to their unpredictable and exuberant natures. Kids might chase, pull on ears or tails, try to ride a big dog (a HUGE no-no!), or even take away a toy. Any of these can result in a bite to the hands or face.

Before you have children over, talk to their parents first, so they can explain protocol to the youngsters. When they come over, let your dog greet them casually, and have them give her a treat or two. Then, simply maintain a calm atmosphere. If the children want to play hard and your dog seems concerned, put her in a room that’s off-limits to the kids.

 

6. Too Much Noise

According to a Louisiana State University study, dogs have a range of hearing nearly twice that of humans. This allows them to hear much higher sounds than us, which is why playing entertainment devices too loudly can cause dogs to seek out a far corner of the home for peace and quiet. Even a loud, boisterous crowd watching a sports event on TV can create anxiety in some dogs.

Respect your dog’s sensitivity to sound, and keep radios, televisions, and other noise producing devices set to a reasonable volume. If you’re having a party with loud music, move your dog as far from the noise as possible.

 

7. Too Many Baths

No one wants a smelly dog in their home. But dogs were not meant to be bathed as often as humans bathe. If their skin and coat are robbed of their natural oils too often, both will become dry and unhealthy. Dry skin can lead to chronic scratching, hot spots or full-on dermatitis. 

Most dogs don’t like to be bathed, because it requires them to have their bodies soaked down and handled while they remain vulnerable. Most dogs dislike having their feet and legs handled, and despise getting soap in their eyes. Plus, many people fail to use warm enough water when bathing their dogs. 

If he smells or is clearly dirty, then go for it. But don’t schedule a weekly bath just because you think it’s appropriate. Instead, brush and comb your dog daily. This allows you to remove dirt, dead hair, and skin. When you do bathe your dog, brush and comb first to remove tangles. Then use warm (not hot) water and a mild dog-formulated shampoo. (We like John Paul Pet’s Oatmeal Shampoo Sensitive Skin Formula for dogs and cats. It gently cleanses, soothes dry skin and coats, and smells lovely. And every single Paul Mitchell and John Paul Pet product is cruelty free. Get yourself some shampoo while you’re at it and say no to animal testing!—Ed).

 

8. Dinner Time Interruptions

You should of course be able to pick up the doggy dish when necessary without any resistance from your dog, so teach her that picking up the dish will always result in a good consequence. With the dish empty first, pick up the dish, place a treat in it, and put it down. Repeat this often. Then randomly do the same while your dog is eating. But once this behaviour is well established, minimize dish handling and let your pooch feast. If someone kept touching your plate during dinner, you’d get annoyed. The same applies to dogs for whom dinner time is their favourite time of day. Once your dog begins to eat, respect her bliss and let her be. Place the dish in a low-traffic area, and instruct all family members to let the dog eat in peace.

September 10, 2015

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25 Hacks Every Dog Onwer should know of

Jenny Chang / BuzzFeed

1. DIY a treat-dispensing toy to entertain them for hours.

DIY a treat-dispensing toy to entertain them for hours.

Or until they eat all the treats. Cut open a tennis ball with a scissor and stuff it with their favorite snack. Get the tutorial here.

2. And play fetch downhill to tire your dog out faster.

This trick is great for high-energy pets that need to run it out.

3. Use a carabiner to easily leash your dog.

Use a carabiner to easily leash your dog.

Don’t spend 10 minutes undoing knots when you get out of the grocery store. Loop the leash handle through the carabiner, wrap it around a post, and hook it onto the remaining length of leash.

4. Put a ball in your dog’s food bowl if he or she eats too fast.

Put a ball in your dog’s food bowl if he or she eats too fast.

They’ll be forced to move the ball around the bowl, which prevents them from scarfing it all down in one lick. Read more about it here.

5. Make an ice lick by freezing toys, bones, and chicken broth into a cake mold.

Make an ice lick by freezing toys, bones, and chicken broth into a cake mold.

It’ll keep them hydrated and occupied for hours.

6. For an on-the-go water break, try a collapsible water bowl.

For an on-the-go water break, try a collapsible water bowl.

Get it here ($9.99).

7. Make a dog car seat using a laundry basket, a pillow, and a blanket.

Make a dog car seat using a laundry basket, a pillow, and a blanket.

To keep your dog safe and in one spot, wrap a blanket around a pillow, place the pillow in the laundry basket, and use the excess fabric to drape around the basket to soften the edges. There’s a chance you’ll want to curl up in there, too.

8. To DIY a cute dog bed, use a crib mattress, a fitted sheet, and a wooden pallet.

To DIY a cute dog bed, use a crib mattress, a fitted sheet, and a wooden pallet.

Get more info here.

9. And if you want to reduce clutter in the bedroom, put your crate where a drawer would go.

And if you want to reduce clutter in the bedroom, put your crate where a drawer would go.

Add a small tension rod and sheer fabric to make it disappear during the day. Learn how to make it here.

10. If your dog hates the crate, opt for a pillow instead.

If your dog hates the crate, opt for a pillow instead.

If you have kids, they’ll want to sleep in there, too.

11. You can also hack an Ikea shelf for a super-modern dog bed.

You can also hack an Ikea shelf for a super-modern dog bed.

You need the Kallax ($34.99) shelf, the Vyssa crib mattress ($34.99), and the Sultan Lade bed base ($9.99). Learn more about it here.

12. To save on floor space, put your dog’s bowls in a bottom drawer.

To save on floor space, put your dog's bowls in a bottom drawer.
Plain & Fancy by Dandamudi’s

Attach a few strips of adhesive-backed Velcro ($2.89) to the bottom of each bowl and to the bottom of the drawer to make sure they don’t slide around. Or get custom stainless steel inserts here.

13. Use peanut butter to distract your dog during nail trimming.

Use peanut butter to distract your dog during nail trimming.

Have a family member who isn’t clipping put peanut butter on their fingers.

14. And if you accidentally cut your dog’s nail too short, stop any bleeding with a mixture of cornstarch and water.

And if you accidentally cut your dog's nail too short, stop any bleeding with a mixture of cornstarch and water.
Taste Of Southern / Via viralnova.com

Apply it to the bleeding nail with a cotton swab — the paste will coagulate the blood and stop it from flowing. If you’re out of cornstarch, try flour or baking soda instead.

15. If you’re traveling with a pet, get a spillproof bowl.

If you’re traveling with a pet, get a spillproof bowl.

Get one here ($19.99).

16. And if your pet loses a toy while you’re on the road, make a crinkle toy from a sock and an empty water bottle.

And if your pet loses a toy while you're on the road, make a crinkle toy from a sock and an empty water bottle.

If your socks are too precious, use a scrap of fabric from an old towel.

17. Use a squeegee to remove dog hair from your car seats.

Use a squeegee to remove dog hair from your car seats.

If you don’t have a squeegee, put on rubber dishwashing gloves and brush the seat, going in one direction to sweep up the hair. Learn more about it here.

18. For the dog that’s constantly trying to climb into the front seat: Use this zip line harness.

For the dog that’s constantly trying to climb into the front seat: Use this zip line harness.
Kurgo

Or make it yourself with nylon rope and two spring clasps. Get it here ($23.69).

19. You can also hook the harness up outside while you’re camping or barbecuing.

You can also hook the harness up outside while you're camping or barbecuing.

This way they can wander a little without getting lost. Learn more about it here.

20. Use chalk around outdoor pet bowls to keep ants out.

Use chalk around outdoor pet bowls to keep ants out.

Ants won’t cross a chalk line because it interferes with their ability to follow scent trails left by other ants, according to SF Gate.

21. If it’s really hot or really cold out, rub Vaseline onto your dog’s paws before stepping outside.

If it's really hot or really cold out, rub Vaseline onto your dog's paws before stepping outside.
John Moore / Getty Images

This will protect the dog’s feet from salt and keep the paws from getting burned on hot pavement. After your walk, you can just rinse the paws in warm water to get rid of any salt or chemicals they might have picked up. Get more info here.

22. If your dog scratches the door to go out, use a door protector to minimize damages.

If your dog scratches the door to go out, use a door protector to minimize damages.

Get it here ($20). You can also make your own door protector by applying clear contact paper to the part of the door where your dog is likely to scratch.

23. Make your own pill pockets in flavors you know your dog will love.

Make your own pill pockets in flavors you know your dog will love.

Roll the mixture into small balls, poke a hole in each ball with a pencil eraser (for the pill), and stick in the refrigerator overnight. Get the recipe here.

24. If your dog is an escape artist, get an escape prevention dog harness.

 

This will keep your pet from slipping through gate and fence cracks. Harness sizes range from extra small to extra large. Get it here ($28.95).

25. And lastly, check out this chart to know the basics of what your dog can and can’t eat.

And lastly, check out this chart to know the basics of what your dog can and can't eat.
July 09, 2015

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June 23, 2015

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28 Ingenious things for your dog

1. Never get inadvertently splashed again with this pet shower curtain.

Never get inadvertently splashed again with this pet shower curtain.

It’s available here for $25.

2. Give your dog a window to the world with the PetPeek Fence Window.

Give your dog a window to the world with the PetPeek Fence Window.

Get it here for $35.

3. These rubber genome toys will make your bully sticks last longer because your dog will have to work to get to it.

These rubber genome toys will make your bully sticks last longer because your dog will have to work to get to it.

Get it here for $5.99.

4. This fold-up chair with pet compartment is perfect for camping, tailgating, or just hanging in the backyard.

This fold-up chair with pet compartment is perfect for camping, tailgating, or just hanging in the backyard.

Get it here for $99.95.

5. For the dog that’s constantly trying to climb into the front seat: use this zip line harness.

For the dog that's constantly trying to climb into the front seat: use this zip line harness.

It’ll also keep ‘em from tumbling down if you slam on the brakes. Get it fromBrookstone.

6. Keep everything in place while traveling with this dog car organizer.

Keep everything in place while traveling with this dog car organizer.
 

Get it here for $17.

7. The Whistle Activity Monitor is an on-collar device that measures your dog’s activities including walks, play, and rest, letting you keep tabs on day-to-day behavior and long-term health trends.

The Whistle Activity Monitor is an on-collar device that measures your dog’s activities including walks, play, and rest, letting you keep tabs on day-to-day behavior and long-term health trends.

It’s like a FitBit for your dog. You can pre-order it here.

8. This special water bowl has a lining that you can place in your freezer, keeping the water cold for a longer period of time.

 

Get it here for $29.99.

9. This light-up collar lights the path for your dog on long dark winter walks.

This light-up collar lights the path for your dog on long dark winter walks.

Get it for here for $15.95.

10. For the pup who engages in proper dining etiquette, there’s a high chair.

For the pup who engages in proper dining etiquette, there's a high chair.

Get it here for $49.95.

11. This handmade shark blanket will keep your dog cozy and warm all winter.

Get it from Etsy.

12. Ride around with the most fashionable dog bike basket ever.

Ride around with the most fashionable dog bike basket ever.

Get it here for $135.

13. With this pet window guard, your dog won’t be able to leap out the window.

With this pet window guard, your dog won't be able to leap out the window.

Get it here for $199.

14. The backseat hammock will keep dogs from taking a tumble on a bumpy ride.

The backseat hammock will keep dogs from taking a tumble on a bumpy ride.

It costs $59.95 from Solutions.

15. The pet umbrella keeps your dog “dry and comfortable.”

The pet umbrella keeps your dog "dry and comfortable."

It’s also a leash. Get it here for $21.88.

16. The escape prevention dog harness keeps your pet from slipping through the cracks.

The escape prevention dog harness keeps your pet from slipping through the cracks.

Get it here for $29.95.

17. The dog water fountain turns drinking water into a game.

The dog water fountain turns drinking water into a game.

Get it from Amazon for $18.

18. If your dog tends to scratch the door and leave marks when it’s time to go out, get the door protector.

If your dog tends to scratch the door and leave marks when it's time to go out, get the door protector.

Available here for $19.98.

19. The Slurpabowl is a cute, recyclable, portable drinking bowl that folds up and attaches to the leash.

The Slurpabowl is a cute, recyclable, portable drinking bowl that folds up and attaches to the leash.

Get a pack of 6 for $9.99 here.

20. These “in the wall” pet bowls fold up when not in use to save space.

These "in the wall" pet bowls fold up when not in use to save space.

Comes in a bunch of different colors, get it here for $99.99.

21. Stay on trend with this adorable dog teepee.

Stay on trend with this adorable dog teepee.

Get it for $300 from Etsy.

22. The dog potty is a more sustainable solution than weewee pads, and folds up for travel or apartment dwelling.

 

 

 

Pre-order this ingenious contraption here.

23. For a multi-person household, get the Membo, which has tiles you can flip that signify whether the dog has been fed already.

For a multi-person household, get the Membo, which has tiles you can flip that signify whether the dog has been fed already.

Get it here for $24.95.

24. Gently and effectively clean your dog’s paws with this brushless paw wash.

Gently and effectively clean your dog's paws with this brushless paw wash.

It’s $28 from Paw Wash.

25. Leanlix are dog treats that come in a lip balm-like tube so you can reward your dog on the go with no mess.

 

They’re also super low-cal! Attach it to your leash or keychain and you’ll always have a dog treat on hand. Get them here for $12.95 for a pack of 3.

26. This collapsible travel cup comes with a carabiner so you can attach it anywhere.

This collapsible travel cup comes with a carabiner so you can attach it anywhere.

Get it here for $9.99.

27. The one-of-a-kind Hydrobone has a foam core that absorbs and releases water as your dog chews it.

The one-of-a-kind Hydrobone has a foam core that absorbs and releases water as your dog chews it.

You can also freeze it for maximum cooling effect. Get it here for $8.99.

28. The iFetch launches tennis balls and acts as an interactive playmate for your pet.

The iFetch launches tennis balls and acts as an interactive playmate for your pet.
June 03, 2015

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5 Ways To Prepare Your Dog For A Baby

 

 

Make a Plan

Most expectant mothers of humans have a birthing plan, one that includes what needs to be packed, what music to put on the ipod, and an array of outfits to put the baby in before she comes home. Doggy moms need to draw up another birthing plan, one that includes the four legged mass of fur that doesn’t understand what the changes in the household mean. This special plan needs to include training (what needs to be worked on, when to work on it, who needs to work with the dog), special smelling times to get used to the scents associated with the new baby and decide on specifics like will the dog be allowed in the nursery? Will the dog be allowed to kiss the baby? Although these decisions may seem trivial compared to natural birth vs. cesarean section, they are still as important and need to be regarded as such.

Manners Matter

If there are obedience issues it is best to fix them before the baby arrives. Basic commands such as sit, stay and leave it will be essential. Begin as soon as you can to establish the foundations for these commands. Have the dog sit before letting him out and before meals. Practice leave it often (This is the one dogs tend to forget if not used on a regular basis).

Quirky Behavior

Some dogs have “cute little quirks” that an owner assumes are harmless, until a baby is in the picture. One of them is jumping up on people as a way to greet them. This is not a good trait to encourage. If a new parent is holding the baby, a dog may try to jump up to see the wee one as well, which may lead to scratches and injury. Once a baby starts tottering, a jumping dog will get excited and topple the little one.

Barking is another issue that needs to be altered. All dogs bark, but excessive barking can be a nuisance and cause unnecessary chaos in the household. Contact a certified trainer to curb a Barky McBarkBark, a seasoned jumper or a chronic chewer of toys.

 

Sniff and Tell

Allow the dog to sniff what will be used on the baby to get used to the new scents. If the dog will be allowed in the nursery, set up a sleeping area for them and toss treats into their bed when they aren’t looking. This will bring about positive associations with the new bed and all the other changes going on in the household. Open a couple of the baby toys at a time and lay them on the floor for the dog to sniff. If the dog tries to take one, give the command to drop it (or leave it… or no, whatever command the dog will respond best to) and offer one of their toys, to teach them what is appropriate to chew on and what is not.

Practice Makes Perfect

While getting ready for the new arrival, practice with a doll. Allow the dog to watch normal everyday interaction (Changing diapers, feeding, rocking etc.) If there are any behavioral concerns such as barking, biting or jumping this is a good way to nip them in the bud before the birth.

 

May 26, 2015

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Firefighters Save Puppies With Teeny-Tiny Oxygen Masks

Firefighters in Palm Coast, Florida, saved a family of dogs with teeny-tiny oxygen masks.

Firefighters in Palm Coast, Florida, saved a family of dogs with teeny-tiny oxygen masks.

The Florida home caught on fire Tuesday, threatening the two humans and six dogs inside.

The Florida home caught on fire Tuesday, threatening the two humans and six dogs inside.

A father and his 2-year-old daughter were treated for smoke inhalation at the Florida Hospital Flagler, Flagler Live reported.

The six dogs, which included two puppies, were rescued when Flagler County Sheriff’s Deputy Steve Williams noticed the animals in the home.

Firefighter David Lawrence found the puppies had suffered smoke inhalation and carefully placed tiny oxygen masks up to the puppies’ little noses.

Firefighter David Lawrence found the puppies had suffered smoke inhalation and carefully placed tiny oxygen masks up to the puppies' little noses.

“We were able to revive all of the dogs with oxygen masks made specifically for household pets,” Flagler County Fire Rescue Chief Don Petito said, according to Orlando’s News 13.

Not all fire departments are equipped with small oxygen masks, even though an estimated 40,000 to 150,000 pets die each year of smoke inhalation and other fire-related causes, according to Project Breathe, which works to provide small oxygen masks to fire departments.

A neighbor posted to Facebook that after rushing the animals to the vet “they are now nursing off momma and will recover with rest.”

 

 

May 26, 2015

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6 Ways to Naturally Prevent and Get Rid of Fleas on Dogs

 With the recent outbreak of Lime disease in North America we thought to ourselves it might be a good idea to protect out dogs against, mesquites, fleas and ticks ...

1. Flea collar

A flea collar is a great way to ward off fleas without always having to reapply something topically, and it keeps the flea control constant and steady.

You will need…

-3-5 drops of cedar oil or lavender oil
- 1-3 tablespoons of water
-Bandana OR your dog’s collar
-an eyedropper (optional)

Directions

Dilute 2-3 drops of your chosen oil in 1-3 tablespoons of water. Some people use the oil undiluted, but I personally feel it should always be diluted, even if it’s only by a little. Next, pick out a bandana to be the flea collar-I think a bandana is preferable because you can take it on and off and your dog’s collar won’t smell. It’s always fun to get creative with patterns and colors here. If you go up to ½ teaspoon you can use up to 5 drops of the liquid. Using an eyedropper or other similar means, apply 5-10 drops of the mixture to the bandana and rub the sides of the fabric together, and then tie it about your dog’s neck in a snazzy way. Reapply oil mixture to the collar once a week. In conjunction with this, 1 or 2 drops of oil diluted with at least 1 tablespoon of olive oil can be placed at the base of your dog’s tail.

2. Flea deterring drink- can be used alongside any of these remedies:

You will need…

-1 teaspoon white distilled vinegar or apple cider vinegar

Directions

For every 40 pound dog add 1 teaspoon of white distilled vinegar or apple cider vinegar to 1 quart of their drinking water. We highly recommend using Braggs Apple Cider Vinegar. Not only does it deter fleas, it improves a pups skin and coat condition from the inside-out.

3. Flea comb

This contains lemon and lemon contains something called limonene, which is a chemical that kills and repels fleas but is harmless to us or our pets.

You will need…

-1 freshly sliced up lemon
-1 pot of fresh water
-a comb, sponge, or brush

Directions:

Boil a pot of water and add the slices of a freshly cut lemon to it. Turn off the heat after the lemons has been added and cover the pot, letting the mixture steep overnight. The next day dip a comb or your pets brush in the liquid (make sure it’s sufficiently cool) and run it through their hair. A sponge works as well, especially if you have a very short haired breed. A quick version is to bring water to a vigorous boil and then pour over a freshly sliced lemon. Then just dip the comb, let it cool, and use as above.

4. Flea spray

As a bonus, your pup will get a nice gleaming finish to their coat after using this flea spray.

You will need…

-1 cup white distilled vinegar OR 1 cup apple cider vinegar OR a 50/50 blend of both
-1 quart fresh water
-2-3 drops of lavender or cedar oil
-a decent sized spray bottle

Directions

The essential oil isn’t vital, but it certainly gives the spray an extra edge (and a nice smell.) If you’re using it, add 2-3 drops as you add 1 cup of white distilled vinegar/apple cider vinegar/both to 1 quart of fresh water. Fill your spray bottle, and mist your dog, being careful not to get it in their eyes, nose, or ears-aka avoid spraying near the face. To get up around the neck and behind the ears/their chin area, dampen a soft cloth with the mixture and wipe it on. Spray your pets bedding and around it with this mixture lightly as well.

5. Flea (be-gone) bag

This little sachet contains things that smell pleasant to us, but that drive pests away from your pet.

You will need…

-Two 6 inch squares of breathable fabric (such as muslin)
-a rough handful of cedar chips
-1-2 teaspoons of dried lavender buds
-the peel of 1 lemon

Directions

Follow the instructions on how to make a sachet here if you need more detail. Cut 2 6 inch squares of fabric and place them together inside out. Sew all but 1 side and turn inside out. Fill with a rough handful of fragrant cedar chips, 1-2 teaspoons of lavender, and 1 lemon peel. Leave enough room at the top so you can tie it off with a ribbon or sew it shut (tying allows you to reuse it when the contents lose their potency.) Place under your pets bed/bedding or near it to ward off fleas. Change the mixture every month or so.

6. Flea bath- wash your pup with this weekly to deter fleas.

You will need…

-A half a cup of freshly squeezed lemon juice*
-1 ½ – 2 cups of fresh water
-1/4 –1/2 cup of mild pet-friendly soap or shampoo

Directions

Stir together a half a cup of lemon juice, 1 ½ cups of water, and ¼ cup of mild pet-friendly shampoo or soap. Bottle and label and bathe weekly to keep fleas away.

*amounts will vary depending on the size of your dog. As a general rule of thumb, use 2 parts water to every ½ cup of soap and lemon juice.

NOTE: You must always dilute essential oil before using them. Pay attention to and read andrespect your dog’s body language. It may sound odd, but let them sniff the different scents and see how they react. Whichever one you think they “like” the most, or will tolerate should be the one you use. It is estimated that dogs can identify scents 1,000-10,000 times better than humans. Imagine something you hate the smell of, and then imagine it being rubbed all over your body and smelling it 1,000 times stronger!

May 26, 2015

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Summer Skin Treatments D.I.Y for Dogs

We all love summer but sadly sometimes it can give out dogs different skin irritations 

here is a  do it yourself  solution that can help relieve your dog this summer. 

May 19, 2015

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Peanut Butter and Pumpkin Dog Balls

Healthy, no bake nutritional dog treats made with organic peanut butter, organic pumpkin, gluten free oats and honey. They are also human safe!! They taste good! :)
Ingredients
  • ½ cup peanut butter, natural organic
  • 1 cup pumpkin, organic (not pie filling)
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 3 tbsp. honey (I used local)
  • 2½ cups oats (I used Gluten Free)
Instructions
  1. Add parchment paper to a baking sheet; set aside.
  2. In a bowl, add peanut butter, pumpkin, cinnamon and honey; mix until incorporated. Add the oats; mix well. If the consistency seems to wet, add a pinch more oats.
  3. Grab a chunk of the batter and roll into balls and place on prepared baking sheet. Do the same until no more batter remains. NOTE: I rolled my balls into the size of a golf ball, maybe a little bigger.
  4. Place the baking sheet in the fridge to let the balls harder a bit, then store in the refrigerator in an airtight container for up to 3 weeks or place in the freezer for up to 3 months.
Notes
Calories: 59, Fat: 2.6, Cholesterol: 0, Sodium: 1.1, Carbs: 7, Fiber: 1, Sugar: 2, Protein: 2
May 19, 2015

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Healthy Kale Homemade Dog Treats

Healthy Kale Homemade Dog Treats

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch of fresh kale (about 5 big leaves)
  • 1 small bunch of fresh mint leaves
  • ½ cup sugar-free applesauce (or about 2 fresh apples!)
  • ¼ cup of ground flax seed (optional)
  • 4 – 5+ cups whole wheat flour

Steps

  1. Preheat oven to 375°F (or about 190°C).
  2. Adjust rack to sit in the lower-middle slot. I’ve found this is best for getting a nice, dry treat.
  3. Optional: In a pot of boiling water, put the kale and mint in for about 2–3 minutes. It’ll bring out the brilliant green colour, as well as soften them a bit. I’ve made this recipe with boiled kale/mint and with raw kale/mint and it’s turned out fantastic either way. The only thing to remember with boiling them is that the leaves will absorb water and therefore you’ll need more flour (I used about 5 cups). If you’re not boiling the kale/mint, you’ll need less flour, or may need to add a little more applesauce to balance it out.
  4. Blend the kale, mint, and apple sauce in a blender or food processor.
  5. You can incorporate the flour and flax seed by hand or cheat (like I did!) and use a food processor. If you’re using a food processor, you’ll likely have to remove the dough and put it in a bowl to incorporate the last few cups of flour and to get the right consistency in the treat. I found these treats (because I boiled the kale) really needed a lot of flour. You don’t want these to be wet and tacky.
  6. Cut into whatever shape of cookie cutter you have, or splurge (hehe!) and buy a nice set of dog bone shaped cutters!
  7. Place on a non-stick baking sheet (or use parchment paper to avoid any mess at all!) and bake at 375°F for 30 minutes or until hard and dry. Flip after 15 minutes.
  8. For a softer treat (keep in mind these won’t last as long as the dryer treats), bake about 20–25 minutes.
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